20D April

April 21, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

A Little something before we start today:
My Photography Exhibit at the Scranton Library 
in Madison comes down on Thursday Morning, April 27.

For those of you who haven't seen it yet
and are close enough to drive, IF you want to;
Come before Thursday.

 

Now back to our regularly scheduled program: 

 

April is the month I upgraded to a DSLR.  In December, 2002 I migrated from my Canon T50 to a Canon digital camera:
A Powershot G2.  I loved that camera.  It was just 4mb.  However shooting at the highest resolution still provided me the opportunity to print out images up to 16x20 with no signs of pixelation. The G2 worked so well for me because it was compact and produced such high quality prints.  However, because it was around this time that I became interested in moving into a professional realm, I realized showing up on photography events with a point and shoot camera wasn’t lending itself to my appearance.  In February 2005, I began investigating DSLRs.  I knew I wanted to stay in the Canon family as the last two cameras I owned had been been Canons.

 

I settled on the Canon EOS 20D.

 

Image from:
Wikimedia

Canon_EOS_20D_front.jpg

 

Purchased in Middletown, Connecticut at Midtown Photo in April 2005, I immediately saw the benefit of having an SLR again after using a point and shoot for a few years:  
I liked the heft of the 20D.
I liked being able to wrap my hands around a camera the way you’re supposed to.

Most importantly, I liked having a faster shutter speed.

 

Having an SLR again also leant me more credibility as a professional. One story I can relate to this as an example:
My brother, Mike is a fireman and when he was hired at one of his jobs, I travelled to the ceremony with my SLR.  As I took several pictures, someone walked up to me and asked if I worked for a local paper.  Had I arrived with a point and shoot camera, it is almost guaranteed that I would have been ignored.

 

In 2009, I upgraded my 20D to the 40D.  I still own that camera and it has more than paid for itself countless times over.

 

That G2 gave me the bridge to cross to become professional.  I’m glad I started out with a point and shoot canon, because I wouldn’t have wanted to spend over a thousand dollars on an SLR and lenses only to realize I wasn’t interested.

 

If turning professional is something you are considering, I suggest going the same route.

 

In the meantime:
Focus on what's ahead of you.
--
Chris

 

 

 


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...